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STEM Jobs: 2017 Update

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers help drive our nation's innovation and competitiveness by generating new ideas and new companies.1 For example, workers who study or are employed in these fields are more likely to apply for, receive, and commercialize patents.2 STEM knowledge also has other benefits; while often very specialized, it can be transferred to a wide variety of careers, particularly management occupations, while increased technology in the workplace means that, to handle non-repetitive tasks, workers need the critical thinking and technical skills that come with STEM training.3

2015: What is Made in America?

Accurately determining how much of our economy's total manufacturing production is American-made can be a daunting task. However, data from the Commerce Department's Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) can help shed light on what percentage of the manufacturing sector's gross output is considered domestic. This report works through several estimates of how to measure the domestic content of the U.S. gross output of manufactured goods, starting from the most basic estimates and working up to the more complex estimate, domestic content.

Estimating the Investment and Job Creation Impact of the EB-5 Program

Cover art for the Estimating the Investment and Job Creation Impact of the EB-5 Program report.At the request of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Economics and Statistics Administration (ESA) of the Department of Commerce (DOC) conducted an assessment of the EB-5 program to determine its size and its contribution to the U.S. economy. To accomplish this, we examined individual projects that were active during a two-year period, FY2012 and FY2013, and compiled a new dataset that includes the number of EB-5 projects, the number of investors, the amount of EB-5 and non-EB-5 related investment spending and the resulting expected1 job creation.

The Benefits and Costs of Apprenticeships: A Business Perspective

Cover Image for The Benefits and Costs of Apprenticeships: A Business Perspective ReportIn 2014, President Obama set out an ambitious goal to double the number of apprenticeships to 750,000 by the end of 2018, and to diversify them as well. This year the half million mark was passed. However, despite their increasing popularity and proven benefit to workers, apprenticeships are not fully understood in the United States, especially from the point of view of U.S. employers. The skilled trades that support our nation’s construction industry still represent the core of American apprenticeships, but many other industries, like health care and information technology (IT), are adopting apprenticeships to create a skilled workforce for jobs they cannot otherwise fill easily, if at all. Along the way, firms are not only starting apprenticeships in new occupations and industries but also opening doors for women and minorities.

Council Recommendations Report

Commerce Data Advisory Council (CDAC)

Delivered to U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker

Measuring the Value of Cross-Border Data Flows

The Internet has transformed how Americans live, work, and play. It has connected people around the world in new ways through data that flows seamlessly across borders. Businesses rely on cross-border data flows to access markets and interact with customers across the globe; find new suppliers; and communicate with their overseas affiliates. Citizens rely on these flows to access a wealth of information from around the world; communicate with family, friends, and colleagues overseas; and gain access to foreign consumer and financial markets. Data users around the globe are exploring new ways to use big data to learn more about the world in which they live.

Intellectual Property and the U.S. Economy: 2016 Update

Cover image for Intellectual Property and the U.S. Economy: 2016 Update report.Innovation and creative endeavors are indispensable elements that drive economic growth and sustain the competitive edge of the U.S. economy. The last century recorded unprecedented improvements in the health, economic well-being, and overall quality of life for the entire U.S. population.1 As the world leader in innovation, U.S. companies have relied on intellectual prop- erty (IP) as one of the leading tools with which such advances were promoted and realized. Pat- ents, trademarks, and copyrights are the principal means for establishing ownership rights to the creations, inventions, and brands that can be used to generate tangible economic benefits to their owner.

ICT-Enabled Services Trade in the European Union

In the past, as with goods, the provision of a service either required the physical delivery of information via traditional shipping options or required travel by the purchaser or provider. Now, businesses and consumers are increasingly using the Internet to purchase services. While most commodities must still be physically delivered, there are a number of services that can be delivered almost instantaneously online at a relatively small cost, not only domestically but across the globe.

Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Update to 2013 Report

Office of the Chief Economist SealThe United States remains an attractive destination for foreign direct investment (FDI) for a variety of reasons, including a large consumer base, a productive workforce, a highly innovative environment, and legal protections.  As a result, foreign firms make investments in the United States on a regular basis by establishing new operations, purchasing existing operations of another company, or providing additional capital to their existing U.S. operations. This report, which updates a report released in 2013, examines recent trends in FDI and highlights newly released “greenfield” FDI data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA).1 Foreign direct investment trends identified in the earlier report have continued to 2015.

Digital Matching Firms: A New Definition in the “Sharing Economy” Space

Office of the Chief Economist SealIncreasingly, consumers and independent service providers are engaging in transactions facilitated by an Internet-based platform. The digital firms that provide the platforms are often collectively referred to as belonging to the "sharing" or "collaborative" economies, among other descriptors.

What is Made In America?

Made In America Industry Collage

Ninth in a Series of Manufacturing Profiles: What is Made in America? These profiles are a follow-up to the ESA report "What is Made in America?" which estimates the dollar value and domestic-production percentage of what America produces.

Made In America: Primary Metal Products

In 2013, shipments from the U.S. manufacturing sector totaled $5.8 trillion. How much of these shipments do we make in the United States? This series of manufacturing profiles by the U.S. Commerce Department's Office of the Chief Economist (OCE) will answer that question one industry at a time. This ninth profile explores primary metal products. Previous profiles examined machinery; food, beverages and tobacco products; transportation equipment (excluding motor vehicles); chemicals; apparel, leather, and allied products; petroleum and coal productscomputer and electronic products; and fabricated metal products.

The Pay Premium for Manufacturing Workers as Measured by Federal Statistics

Historically, manufacturing jobs have offered relatively high pay. However, there is not a consensus on the size of the pay premium for manufacturing jobs relative to the economy as a whole or even whether a premium continues to exist. This report turns to evidence to answer those questions, using ten federal datasets, each of which allows us to calculate and compare the average pay of manufacturing workers and the average pay of workers overall. The following datasets are included:

Taking the High Road: New Data Show Higher Wages May Increase Productivity, Among Other Benefits

There is a wealth of evidence that manufacturing jobs are good jobs. But not all manufacturing jobs are created equal. Published data highlight the considerable variation in pay and productivity across manufacturing industries. For example, workers in the computer and electronic product manufacturing industry earn an average of $34 per hour (as of May 2015), while those in apparel manufacturing earn an average of $17 per hour.

Temporary Help Workers in the U.S. Labor Market

The number of jobs in the temporary help services industry reached an all-time high of 2.9 million in May 2015, accounting for 2.4 percent of all private sector jobs in the U.S. economy. This short report looks at the latest official U.S. government statistics on the temporary help services industry and its workforce to provide an overview of its role in the labor market and the U.S. economy. The temporary help services industry tends to be a leading indicator of employment and fluctuates with the business cycle.

The Value of the American Community Survey: Smart Government, Competitive Businesses, and Informed Citizens

Cover Image - The Value of the American Community Survey: Smart Government, Competitive Businesses, and Informed CitizenThe American Community Survey (ACS) is the largest continuous household survey in the United States, providing a wealth of information about the economic, social, and demographic characteristics of persons, as well as housing characteristics.

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